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A book that will define and influence the way the next generation of scholars will look at the American empire in the Philippines and Asia. An impressive book that is both highly specific and broadly suggestive. It presents a thorough and thoughtful study of the imperial relationship between the United States and the Philippines. A solid contribution toward building a new historiography of U.

This book has much to offer those interested in Phillipine-American relations as well as postcolonial studies, and, surprisingly, given its length, leaves one wishing for more. A truly transnational study of empire in which forces in the metropole and colony carry equally explanatory weight. Sure to be a touchstone of transnational history for years to come. See All Customer Reviews.

Editorial Reviews

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Overview In the United States, having announced its arrival as a world power during the Spanish-Cuban-American War, inaugurated a brutal war of imperial conquest against the Philippine Republic. Over the next five decades, U. In this pathbreaking, transnational study, Paul A. Kramer reveals how racial politics served U.

The Blood of Government: Race, Empire, the United States, and the Philippines

Kramer argues that Philippine-American colonial history was characterized by struggles over sovereignty and recognition. In the wake of a racial-exterminist war, U. The former were subjected to a calibrated colonialism that gradually extended them self-government as they demonstrated their "capacities.

Kramer provides an innovative account of the global transformations of race and the centrality of empire to twentieth-century U. About the Author Paul A. Kramer is associate professor of history at Vanderbilt University. Show More. Average Review. Write a Review. Related Searches. An American-Mexican Frontier. View Product.

The Blood of Government | Paul A. Kramer | University of North Carolina Press

Thomas Jefferson and Abraham Lincoln both considered small business the backbone of American democracy and Erez Manela. Margot Canaday. Greg Grandin. Michael Adas. Lien-Hang T. Editorial Reviews Review An important work not only to the field of Philippine-American studies, but also to the studies of race and imperialism in general. The author shows impressive command of. Highly recommend[ed]. The Blood of Government: Race, Empire, the United States, and the Philippines is richly illustrated, clearly written, and full of vivid conceptualized terms.

The skillful way in which Kramer interweaves cultural, social, military, and political narratives makes his book a standard-setter in international history. It is a must-read for historians interested in imperial culture, racial formation, comparative empires, and nationalism, as well as those with area-studies interests in Philippine and US history.

It [approaches] its subject in a fresh and provocative way. Lucidly written and empirically grounded, Kramer's book draws on both classic and more recent scholarship on the gendering and racialization of the modern state, applying these to a place that has often been bypassed by historians of comparative colonialism and nationalism. A much needed and innovative intervention into the scholarship on the American empire and the Philippine nation-state, it also marks a critical addition to the growing literature on the history of America's current imperial moment.

Rafael, University of Washington A very significant contribution to the study of American imperialism. A book that will define and influence the way the next generation of scholars will look at the American empire in the Philippines and Asia. An impressive book that is both highly specific and broadly suggestive. It presents a thorough and thoughtful study of the imperial relationship between the United States and the Philippines.

The Blood of Government: Race, Empire, the United States, and the Philippines (Philippine Edition)

A solid contribution toward building a new historiography of U. This book has much to offer those interested in Phillipine-American relations as well as postcolonial studies, and, surprisingly, given its length, leaves one wishing for more.

Race, Empire, the United States, and the Philippines

A truly transnational study of empire in which forces in the metropole and colony carry equally explanatory weight. Sure to be a touchstone of transnational history for years to come. Kramer delves deeply into the Filipino past in order to reconstruct how they in particular, their elites, ilustrados , and the revolutionaries, the Katipunan viewed themselves when they encountered Americans.

Kramer reinterprets the concept and practice of race as a rich and complex framework for political and cultural inquiry into the history of imperialism. He demonstrates persuasively how colonial relations were not a one-way imposition of power from metropolis to periphery, but consisted of genuine contacts and interactions, forged by violence, conflict, collision, and collaboration. See all Editorial Reviews. Not Enabled. Share your thoughts with other customers. Write a customer review.

Showing of 9 reviews. Top Reviews Most recent Top Reviews. There was a problem filtering reviews right now. Please try again later. Format: Paperback Verified Purchase. Currently Dr. Kramer teaches courses at both the graduate and undergraduate level at Vanderbilt University.

Kramer argues that in order to understand how empire makes race and how race helps to shape empire. A third line of difference was based on belonging or not belonging to Hispanic Catholic civilization.

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In doing so, this chapter mentions important events in US racial history such as the Chinese exclusion and the exclusion of Japanese students from San Francisco schools early in the 20th century. The bibliography is approximately twenty pages and forty-three pages of footnotes. Finally he made extensive use of newspapers and periodicals, government documents and other non-governmental primary sources, as well as a vast array of secondary literature.

The historiographical significance of this work in US history is how the author sheds new light on an often overlooked war and aspect of US imperialism, and he is doing so using a transnational lens. As many works have done over the last decade or so, Kramer also notes that not only did the metropole effect the colony, but the colony effected the metropole as well.


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I have no quibbles with this work. While much of it might be known to specialists, this work truly sheds light on Philippine-American history and the role race plays in the construction of Empire. As such it will be very useful to those attempting to teach a college level survey course on US history who wish to discuss American imperialism in the late 19th and early 20th century.

The narrative itself is easy to follow and written with a clear voice. The only problem is the size of the work might throw off some readers, but once they start reading they will find those worries are unfounded. It is easy to read thanks to the narrative style and will keep you engaged to the end. This is a must get book for anyone interested in the History of Imperialism and specifically the Philippines.

The chapter on the Philippine-American War brings the ugly truth to the surface that the focus of the war was race, and that "race making" is often tied to 'war making" I assign this chapter in my USII survey classes now as the Philippines are often forgot in the larger narrative of Imperialism.

Today, the Philippines are a developing country. Centuries of colonization. Kramer brings this all to the surface. The book is lengthy and dense, so prepare to read the introduction slowly and read with an open mind. On another note, I gave this book to a Filipino friend of mine. He's an engineer, so not a fan of reading per say, but he felt the book addressed the violent history his country faced over the centuries and although the truth stings, so to speak, he was happy to see these issues brought to the surface.