Download e-book When Things Fall Apart: Heart Advice for Difficult Times

Free download. Book file PDF easily for everyone and every device. You can download and read online When Things Fall Apart: Heart Advice for Difficult Times file PDF Book only if you are registered here. And also you can download or read online all Book PDF file that related with When Things Fall Apart: Heart Advice for Difficult Times book. Happy reading When Things Fall Apart: Heart Advice for Difficult Times Bookeveryone. Download file Free Book PDF When Things Fall Apart: Heart Advice for Difficult Times at Complete PDF Library. This Book have some digital formats such us :paperbook, ebook, kindle, epub, fb2 and another formats. Here is The CompletePDF Book Library. It's free to register here to get Book file PDF When Things Fall Apart: Heart Advice for Difficult Times Pocket Guide.

Remember Me.

When Things Fall Apart: Heart Advice for Difficult Times - The CEO Library

Forgot your password? Close Login. Forgot Password. Close Reset Password. Processing Please Don't Refresh the Page. Browse Books. Learn More. Play Sample. Give as a Gift Send this book as a Gift! Book Rating Remove From Cart. Duration: 5 hours 45 minutes. Similar Titles. Reviews Lydya O. Donec in tortor in lectus iaculis vulputate. Sed aliquam, urna ut sollicitudin molestie, lacus justo aliquam mauris, interdum aliquam sapien nisi cursus mauris.

Nunc hendrerit tortor vitae est placerat ut varius erat posuere. Duis ut nisl in mi eleifend faucibus egestas aliquet arcu. Nam id enim sapien. We learn that what truly heals In this book, Chodron calls us to "an unconditional relationship with reality". We learn that what truly heals is gratitude and tenderness". She also says "Every time we give, every time we practice discipline, patiences or exertion, it's like putting down a heavy burden".

I will keep Chodron's wisdeom close by always. Aug 30, Cooljoe rated it it was amazing. This book was recommended to me because during this time, I lost my dad and I was grieving. I am not familiar with the teaching of Buddha. I never read or study it. When Things Fall Apart is not the kind of book I would normally read.

But I was curious and I respect and admire the person that recommended it. The book goes against the grain of what we are taught about suffering and pain. Chodron says that life is suffering and that through suffering we get closer to enlightenment. I don't know, su This book was recommended to me because during this time, I lost my dad and I was grieving. I don't know, suffering and pain hurt.

I habitually try to avoid pain, distract myself, repressed it and do everything to avoid pain. She said do the opposite. And it took me to the end of the book to finally , gradually agree with her. I dont want it embrace the pain but I am not going to struggle with it- like a wave , I am not going to swim against it but rather let it take me to where ever it will take me.

That is hard for me. But I am willing to try it. That is actually a piece of reality, we are delusional when we think we have plenty of time-we don't. The only time that exist is- You Are Here X in life. I like the meditation part, although I never meditated. She talks about breathing in , the negatives not just for you but for all the people that are feeling the negative energy and breathe out the light, the positive. I tried it , I felt better.

Chodron talks a lot about loving yourself, be compassionate with yourself, all parts, find the beauty in you and be kind with your flaws. I will end that Chodron says when you stuck stop doing the same things you done in the past, unstuck yourself by letting go and go into new paths. Do things differently from your past. This was my first Buddhist-related read for a decade, now, and I was able to reflect on how large chunks of my overall attitude toward life was shaped by the few sources I read back then.

Reading this now not only helped that sink in, but also provided much needed advice for difficult times, as advertised by the subtitle.


  1. When Things Fall Apart.
  2. The Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act (EPCRA): A Summary!
  3. The Rinuccis: Carlo, Ruggiero & Francesco: The Italians Wife by Sunset / The Mediterranean Rebels Bride / The Millionaire Tycoons English Rose (Mills ... By Request) (The Rinucci Brothers, Book 4).
  4. Harmonium: Piano/Vocal/Chords!
  5. When Things Fall Apart: Heart Advice for Difficult Times (20th Anniversary Edition)?
  6. DOG 4491.
  7. The Evolution of Mortality.

Useful read. It was recommended by and borrowed from my therapist reading some reviews, I see at least one other person who got the same recommendation from his. I did not car This was my first Buddhist-related read for a decade, now, and I was able to reflect on how large chunks of my overall attitude toward life was shaped by the few sources I read back then. I did not care much for many of the specific personal anecdotes related to her main teacher, Trungpa Rinpoche, since I ended up reading a bit about him prior to starting the book and found what I read to be a bit too cult-like and off putting.

On the other hand, descriptions of the process of practicing unconditional love, especially toward yourself, as well as resisting the urge to react and do the same thing you typically end up doing to resolve a crisis and instead let it all sink in, were well developed and well presented. Suffering is as much a part of life as joy, trying to shield yourself from it is shielding yourself from life itself. Life will always continue to offer both suffering and joy and a myriad of other things in unexpected ways, so there's no point in trying to cling on to a false sense of security, or be addicted to hope for some better future - both lead to a cycle of unnecessary avoidable let downs of not facing the truths of the human condition: fallibility and impermanence being pretty high up there.

And as Vonnegut eloquently put it: "There's only one rule that I know of, babies — God damn it, you've got to be kind. Mar 15, Leslie is currently reading it. This is one of those great keepers you read, reread and then loan to friends in times of need. Though I was baptized an Episcopaelian, I appreciate the philosophy and spirituality of most religions. This I first read after my mom was killed before Christmas the year I got my B. The great message is remembering that we need to learn to live with this sort of groundlessness, when the worl This is one of those great keepers you read, reread and then loan to friends in times of need.

The great message is remembering that we need to learn to live with this sort of groundlessness, when the world pulls the rug, even the earth, from beneath our feets and nothing is ever the same again. This is life--unfair, even brutal at times, but oh-so-beautiful and magical if you just hang on long enough to make it through the darkness. Next to Wolfelt's books, this is one of the best books I read in the throes of my deepest grief and return to anytime I am confused or overworked, or simply stressed out. It balances me.

Jul 23, Katie rated it it was amazing. This is easily one of the most important books I've ever read.

When Things Fall Apart: Heart Advice for Difficult Times (Shambhala Classics)

I've been dealing with a lot of stress lately and I think somehow this book found me at just the right time. This is one of those books you could read a chapter of every day for the rest of your life and you would always find something new, something useful to help you live your life in a better way.

She talks This is easily one of the most important books I've ever read. She talks a lot about appreciating the present moment, that what we consider problems are often opportunities, and that we shouldn't strive to make everything perfect, because life isn't perfect. Simply put, this is an amazing book about the power of being mindful, of letting go, and about the importance of introspection.

We feel that compassion is reserved for someone else, and it never occurs to us to feel it for ourselves. May 12, Julie Ehlers rated it it was amazing Shelves: books-that-are-awesome , buddhism-and-such. This was wonderful. Pema Chodron expresses Buddhist ideas in such a joyful, irresistible way. Everyone should read this book. View all 6 comments. Dec 26, Anf rated it it was amazing Shelves: personal-development , spiritual. It was a trip full of lessons but I'll save that story for another time. Recently I was dealing with the challenges of letting go, an attachment.

I'm still working through it. So it was timely that I came upon this work and weeks after placing it on hold at my local library I finally got a hold of it. What if we didn't have to run or hide when we're faced with those uncomfortable reminders? What if instead of running away, like we normally do, we choose to run towards our fear? What would happen then? Would we experience what it is to truly live? Dec 18, Melissa rated it liked it Shelves: religion , non-fiction. With everything that's happened in my life this year, my mom found this book and thought it would be a good read for me. And indeed, the title was very very fitting, however, actually applying what is in this book could prove to be very difficult.

Pema Chodron is an American Buddhist and as such, this book is mainly about Buddhism and its practices. And maybe its just because I know barely anything about Buddhism, but I found this to be a very high level book.

When Things Fall Apart - Heart Advice for Difficult Times Book

She talks about using dharmas, lonel With everything that's happened in my life this year, my mom found this book and thought it would be a good read for me. She talks about using dharmas, loneliness, meditation and other ways of looking at the world. The prevailing theme is that things that make us uncomfortable should be examined instead of ignored. We shouldn't be scared of loneliness, despair, and loss but rather should examine them and accept them.

She offers tips for how to do this and shares stories about the ways other people have found to live this way. And she odes warn that it is a struggle. As said before I found this book to be very high level. In fact, I really didn't understand most of what she was talking about. Which I wasn't prepared for from the cover and the back cover description. It seemed like something that would be more for everyone. But I would highly recommend someone knowing a little something about Buddhism and its terms before reading this book.

Otherwise, they may be just as lost as I was. That's not to say I didn't understand everything though. There were a few passages that spoke to me and that I could relate to. In particular, she talks about how we as humans build sandcastles and guard them jealously, even though in the end we know they'll be swept away by the sea and we're ok with that. She says that kind of nonattachment is healthy and something we should strive for. And that makes sense. I also was quite fond of a quote found in there. I don't think so, and I like Chodron's theory that honesty involves incorporating kindness as well.

It is not noble to always tell the truth with no thought of the consequences. I'm in no way advocating lying, but there is a way to tell the truth with compassion. And one person's truth is not always anothers. Definitely not the book I thought it was going to be, and I think if I had been educated further on Buddhism I would have enjoyed it a lot more. As such, there was just too much that was really only geared towards practitioners of Buddhism and hard to understand for the rest of us.

But there are some valuable lessons to take away from this book even without that knowledge. Reynard More of my reviews can be found at www. Dec 17, C. G rated it liked it. Don't worry, I'm not going through "difficult times" right now, but despite this book's title, it had a lot of good insight for not-falling-apart lives, too. I was less interested in some of her discussions of meditation, so I skimmed some parts.

This is where the review ends and my shamefully public journaling begins. One of the ideas that I want to remember - maybe get tattooed? Chodron talks about how we might put a lot of time and pride into so Don't worry, I'm not going through "difficult times" right now, but despite this book's title, it had a lot of good insight for not-falling-apart lives, too.

Chodron talks about how we might put a lot of time and pride into something - a job, a relationship, a sense of security - but like a sand castle, the tide will eventually come in and demolish it. This doesn't mean we shouldn't spend time building the sand castles, but we should accept the impermanence of them. Another thing in the book I found helpful was her discussion of compassion and generosity.

I deal with The Public at work, which is normally fine-to-good, but occasionally I deal with people who externalize their issues. I put up a post-it at work with the attitudes "kindness, humor, and good-heartedness," which hopefully will help equip me for the crazos. I also appreciated what she says about disappointment: "When there's a big disappointment, we don't know if that's the end of the story. It may be just the beginning of a great adventure.

And I know these good things in my life will end some day, and that will be a good even if it's painful. Finally, some quotes: "We cannot be in the present and run our storylines at the same time. In fact that Jun 05, Jill rated it it was ok Shelves: religious-misc , american-lit , self , psych-misc. I couldn't more strongly disagree with a lot of Chodron's "teachings. There is a whole lot of focus on how all of us are afraid of death and that we will do anything to "ward off the sense of death, no matter what.

I have never had a fear of death. I think about it fairly often in the context of, "If I were to die today, would I be ready? She really does her best and wholeheartedly believes in what she's sharing. The first section is a lot about meditation. I think meditation is a necessary and healthy thing, but I believe that breathing patterns aren't as important as focusing on your relationship with God and where you stand with Him.

I believe hope is also a essential and healthy thing.


  1. A Small Flirtation?
  2. Account Options.
  3. Listeners Also Bought;
  4. Bestselling Series!
  5. Peach Orchard Mama.

It was definitely difficult to scare up enough stamina to finish a book that teaches precepts to which my whole life has been lived in direct opposition. It's not that I'm offended by her opinions, but I'm really baffled by her all-encompassing statements about the human family and how we all supposedly think and feel. If you buy what she says, it would have been impossible for me to have lived any sort of content life.

However, I have lived a happy life. With hope, with God, etc. She says we "don't deserve resolution, but just an open state of mind to paradox and ambiguity.

{dialog-heading}

I must do what I can to find resolution. I better quit my rant there. It makes me sad - the idea that anyone could pick this up and accept it as the end-all, be-all for finding happiness. She does have some good things to say about serving others and helping to release their pain. She has a lot of focus about kindness to others, which I appreciated. There's just a lot more to life than sitting and breathing properly, accepting defeat and thereby being at ease with hopelessness. Jul 21, Michael Cabus rated it it was amazing.

The revelation of this book is how powerful it is to embrace and experience uncertainty and difficulties as opportunities to grow. These moments have mystery and purpose.

When Things Fall Apart: Heart Advice for Difficult Times

And running from them only means we miss that experience. There is a sense of urgency. An emphasis on the idea that we do not have all the time we think we do. It's a true approach to meditation, which on the surface seems passive. This is because if you live life as a present moment person you begin to see every moment as impe The revelation of this book is how powerful it is to embrace and experience uncertainty and difficulties as opportunities to grow.

This is because if you live life as a present moment person you begin to see every moment as impermanent; impermanence breeds a desire to experience the present moment, no matter its quality, as fully as possible. As if we will lose our eyesight tomorrow so we must observe everything today so we remember it.

When Things Fall Apart: Heart Advice for Difficult Times

Chodron urges us to "do everything as if it were the only thing in the world that mattered, while at the same time knowing that it doesn't matter at all". We experience everything while recognising each day is a new day. Not an easy task. However buddhism isn't meant to be easy. It's about changing old habits. Not doing what we've always done but rather to be open to new ways. This book is life changing, and challenging. And one of the best books on how to be resilient I've read. It changed my perspective on the way to live with life being uncertain and even chaotic.

Doing this as a society can change the world. Apr 30, Heidi The Reader rated it it was amazing Shelves: buddhism , the-great-work. Chodrun's writings challenge me to approach my practice and life situation with more humor and kindness than I believed possible. Her words are simple but powerful. I don't know what else to say about this book except: read it.

And may you and all beings be free from suffering. Mar 02, Reja Janaki Joy Green rated it it was amazing. This book is a very gentle guide for every one of us. We need not wait until we experience problems in holding everything together before we benefit from this wisdom. Just being alive in a body and breathing qualifies us! The authoe tells us that she is merely passing on the teachings of Trungpa Rinpoche, telling us: "May these teachings take root and flourish for the benefit of all sentient beings now and in the future.

It sounds so simple and yet we keep forgetting this beautiful truth. This thought brings gratitude to our lives. We can thank the situation for showing us just where we are still stuck and then move out of it to freedom. Pema Chodron offers us countless tools to use in our lives to address our problems. One of them is simply to breath and become aware that there are perhaps many people who are experiencing the same misery and pain. What we discipline is any form of potential escape from reality.

MORE IN Wellness

In other words, discipline allows us to be right here and connect with the richness of the moment. It feels as if each word is a caress for the Soul. I hope you will enjoy it as I did. Shelves: nonfiction , religion , wish-list , for-my-future-office. I don't think that I need to say anything else other than that, but that day was the first time I really picked up a book by Pema Chodron.

I'd read some of her work for a world religion class, but that was it. And my mom has the hugest admiration of her, so I've heard her name in passing before. However, since then, it's been hard. Chodron's note at the end of the book about how rough times are here and that we can choose 4. Chodron's note at the end of the book about how rough times are here and that we can choose to do two things, one is to cower in a corner and the other is to embrace the chaos to continue living. And, this book really is lovely. Even if you're not Buddhist, you can still get something out of this book.

You can leave out the names and things, but at least take the concepts and some of the practices to implement in your daily life. Hell, I do half of this stuff and have for years without knowing the words for it. The chapters on tonglen meditation and opinions were very poignant for me, two things that I need to work on in my own life. Using the Buddhist philosophies and teachings as its basis, Pema's message in this book is to not run away from our difficulties, our pain, our fears but to run towards them as this is the only way forward and the only way to heal. Through the practice of mindfulness and meditation and through compassion for and acceptance of others can we come through the darkness.

We need to look outward in order to help ourselves and others. And most importantly and perhaps the hardest of all, is that we need Using the Buddhist philosophies and teachings as its basis, Pema's message in this book is to not run away from our difficulties, our pain, our fears but to run towards them as this is the only way forward and the only way to heal. And most importantly and perhaps the hardest of all, is that we need to be and stay in the moment.

Be present in the now. I think no matter what your spiritual beliefs are, what is offered here is a universal message of kindness, acceptance, understanding and love for yourself and for others and surely that is all any of us want. Especially in light of the very recent, tragic events here in Melbourne this is even more relevant and needed right now. So many things fell apart in and I'm sure more things will in If only we could all adopt the wisdom from this book. I'm glad this is my last book read in Jan 05, Donna rated it it was amazing Shelves: non-fiction , personal-development , inspirational.

This is Nonfiction-Religion. The author is Buddhist and she teaches tools of her faith and how to utilize them in real life situations. I really liked this one, some parts I liked more than others. This was a solid 4 stars for me, but I'll add the highly coveted 5th star for two reasons.

First, this had some parts that I would have gone over with a bright highlighter for future reference and that leads to the second reason. There were enough of the highlighted areas that would warrant a complete This is Nonfiction-Religion. There were enough of the highlighted areas that would warrant a complete re-read. I loved the simplicity here. She had some great practical advice. I loved the way she talked about compassion and also about not ignoring things that cause emotional discomfort.

The author did cover meditation, but I was so relieved that it didn't get all weird like other books have been about the subject. Overall, this one was worth reading. May 08, Jonathan rated it really liked it. Actually some pretty good advice buried under the waffley language. Fundamentally I disagree with the anti-medication position, and the suggestion that taking pills is somehow running from problems that should be faced, but that is the issue I have with most things coming from the Buddhist perspective when it comes to mental health.